Partial Introduction - Part II

            In Part II, Popular Music in Brazilian History, going back in time, we returned to the early fifties when, as a boy, I listened fascinated to the inspired ranch marches and fun sambas and marches of those unforgettable carnivals. In the salons of the Automobile Club and the Minas Tênis Clube, in Belo Horizonte, with a lot of serpentine, confetti and scented lance, we played to the songs of Armando Cavalcanti, Klécius Caldas, Braguinha (João de Barro), Lamartine Babo and many others . A long time of my musical initiation, with my ears and heart turned to the Radio, when we enjoyed the carnivals that never return ...
After a teenager, without the knowledge of my traditional Minas Gerais family, I participated in serenades and bohemias alongside experienced night-owls. Loves and desires, existing or imagined, developed throughout the dawn through the beautiful songs of Adelino Moreira, Ary Barroso, Assis Valente, Ataulfo ​​Alves, Geraldo Pereira, Herivelto Martins, Ismael Silva, J. Cascata, Leonel Azevedo, Luiz Gonzaga , Noel Rosa, Orestes Barbosa, Pixinguinha and Wilson Batista. Around seven in the morning, in the extinct Globo bakery, located between the Employee and Santa Efigênia districts, almost opposite the traditional Arnaldo College, the saideira was drunk: a dark beer, stupidly cold, with bread taken from the oven and Mortadella Butter was a luxury item. One lived in an atmosphere of great simplicity and deep brotherhood. Ah! This time so far ... and longing so close!
In 1958, the innovative figure of João Gilberto emerges, without an extensive voice, but very intimate and creative, with a peculiar beat of the guitar. Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes completed the trio responsible for the transformation of Brazilian popular music, consecrated internationally as bossa nova, a different way of singing and playing samba. The musical scene combined sun, sea, blue sky with the beauty and sensuality of the wet and salty walk of the woman from Rio. There was no way to speak of love except with optimism. One of the temples in which this new musical style was practiced and perfected was the famous Beco das Garrafas in Copacabana. Still limited to the mining context and the longing serenades, this awareness of renewal in popular music would only appear to me later.
Already in the 1960s, our stage of nightclubs, the samba-song of the fifties, the elbow pain and the first whiskeys. The passionate sound of the guitar and the odd moonlight were replaced by the surrounding harmony of the piano played in the corner of a smoky room. The building Arcangelo Malleta, on the old Rua da Bahia, appeared as a point of noivagos like me. Student life was on the sidelines as a secondary necessity. It was good to hear Antonio Antonio, Billy Blanco, Dolores Duran, Dorival Caymmi, Haroldo Barbosa, Jair Amorim, Evaldo Gouveia, Johnny Alf, Lupicínio Rodrigues and Tito Madi. Commotive melodies, which played deep in our soul, will always be eternal. It was in the bar that we, romantic and dreamy young people, were comforted by our sorrows and disappointments, because the pain of people does not come out in the newspaper ...
Now, in 1962, a university of engineering, with frequent trips to Rio de Janeiro, I was conquered by the work of Adoniran Barbosa and the Cariocas of São Paulo: Carlos Lyra, Cartola, Jorge Ben (later Ben Jor), Martinho da Vila, Nelson Cavaquinho, Paulinho da Viola, Tom Jobim and Vinicius de Moraes. It was the time of the beach, the draft beer and the ex-Bar Veloso (present Girl of Ipanema). The samba, once again rescued, descended the Morro to be sung in the South Zone. It became famous in an old house on Rua da Carioca, the Zicartola restaurant. In the modest and narrow stage, the late Albino Pinheiro (one of the founders of the Banda de Ipanema), the journalist Sérgio Cabral and the composer Hermínio Bello de Carvalho promoted memorable concerts, in which Nelson Cavaquinho, Paulinho da Viola and, evidently, , Cartola, the owner of the terreiro, among others. Pure lyricism, singing the truths of life, in a simple and expressive way: it is that smell of longing ...
In 1964, a complicated period arose in the country, with the advent of the military dictatorship, being fortunately compensated, by contrast, for the presence of young people: Caetano Veloso, Chico Buarque, Edu Lobo and Gilberto Gil. Like popular music, without losing the "bossa" of life, a mutual ideal of freedom and equality was pursued with critical postures. The songs of the Festivals of Brazilian Popular Music, so ardently disputed in the period between 1965 and 1972, made mostly by TV Record of São Paulo and TV Globo of Rio de Janeiro, became unforgettable. With the beginning of repression and censors acting in cultural productions, despite the exile of several composers and singers, popular music has never been so creative: ... we want to have an active voice / in our destiny to send / more behold the wheel arrives Live / and carry the destination there ... Chico Buarque used the metaphor to give his message. Once again, the Brazilian song was renewed, also depicting a political awareness: but chained nobody can love ...
In the time, when I moved to Rio, the 70s, time seemed to run faster, and our popular music Was still alive with the talented Aldir Blanc, Joao Bosco, Gonzaguinha, Milton Nascimento and Rita Lee. Different styles, contrasting temperaments were imposed when the last violent days of arrests, tortures, bank robberies and kidnappings were unleashed. Leaving the romantic and contemplative phase behind, the songs became ripe, mordant and vibrant. Definitely installed in the context of the Marvelous City, "my carnival" now happened in the Marquês de Sapucaí and in the Band of Ipanema. In the night the nightclubs prevailed, with the monopoly of foreign music. The dance, at the base of "there are two for two here ...", almost died out, but we went on: every day is a day to live ...

 

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